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Year 6

Welcome To Year 6

 

This is are final week working on home learning.  We would just like to say how proud we are with your hard work and excellent attitudes this year.

We know this year hasn't turned out how we expected but everyone of you should be so proud of your time here at Portsdown and know that you will all be missed.

We hope to see you all soon :) 

Have a wonderful summer and keep safe!

 

v.king@portsdown.portsmouth.sch.uk

vicky.wells@portsdown.portsmouth.sch.uk

o.dewing@portsdown.portsmouth.sch.uk

 

Please find all work this week on the links below.

 

Afternoon lessons

 

Gadgets

 

I love films and books about spies! Some of my favourites are Alex Rider, Johnny English, Jane Blond, Spy Kids and, of course, James Bond - 007. Which is yours? One reason I enjoy them is finding out about the incredible gadgets they use on their missions.

Over the next few lessons, we are going to be creating a state-of-the-art gadget for a spy, or one for school, or even one to use around your house. We are going to be persuading our reader to buy one, a bit like an advert you might get on TV, in a magazine or even on the side of a bus!

Friday 3rd July 2020

Skill: Design my own gadget.

Now comes the fun part! You need to come up with your own gadget.  You could use some of the gadgets you looked at in yesterday’s lesson or if you have your own idea use that.

Activity

Complete the table below about you gadget:

 

Catchy name for the gadget

 

 

 

 

 

 

Who is the gadget for?

 

 

 

 

 

Special features

 

 

 

 

 

 

Bonuses/extras

 

 

 

 

Quotation/testimonial

 

 

 

 

Key reason for purchasing

 

 

 

 

 

 

Activity 2: Draw your gadget

 

To help you get a real picture of what your gadget is like, why not have a go at drawing a diagram of it. Make sure to label you diagram with the different features it offers. As you are drawing, you might come up with new ideas that you haven’t thought of yet. Get ready to add them to your plan.

Thursday 2nd July 2020

Skill: Write quotations.

 

Today we are going to practice writing quotations. I’m going to show you how to include a quotation from an expert, witness or previous owner. Let’s look at the example from our model: Listen to what James Bond – who is known by his code number 007 – has to say about this must-have phone: “I thought I had every gadget I required until Q invented the Multi-function Mobile Phone. Now I wouldn’t possibly attempt a mission without it.”

 

1) Choose the person you want to quote: it shouldn’t be someone random! They need to have something useful to say about what you are writing about or be very well known to back you up. E.g. a scientist, a doctor, a previous owner, an inventor, a witness, an expert on topic.

 

2) Tell the reader more about them: As you can see in the example, you can use punctuation to drop in extra information about the person. This could be where they are from, where they work or their experience on the subject. Brackets, dashes or commas can be used to do this.

 

 3) Get your speech punctuation right: As you can see in the example, we need to have the speech marks or inverted commas before the person starts taking and ending when they stop talking after the full stop!

 

4) Introduce your speech with a colon: If you have introduced your speech with a full sentence that makes sense on its own, you should use a colon.

 

 Have a go at writing at least 5 quotations following or imitating the pattern of the model below. Use the inventions below to write your quotations.

 

 I’ve done another one to show you how:

 

 Dr Marc Newton, the gadget supremo from Oxford University, has been testing spy gadgets for decades: “ Of all the gadgets I have tested, the Spy Car 3,000 is the greatest invention. It is a mind-blowing contraption.

 

Activity 3 – Wednesday 24th June 2020 –

 

Skill: Create a toolkit for persuasive writing.

 

Before we start thinking about our own ideas for advertising our gadget, we need to look closely at the text and see what writing tools/tips/tricks the author has used so we can do the same in ours.  Below I’ve given you a list of all the key tools for persuasion plus one example. STOP and go back to the text and find as many examples as you can from the text and add them to the toolkit below:

 

Toolkit feature

Example

Hook the reader

start with a question or exclamation to tempt your reader in.

 

Do you always feel bored?

 

 

 

 

 

 

Use imperative/bossy verbs

 

 

Buy now!

 

 

 

 

 

Talk to the reader – 2 nd person

 

 

Would YOU like to be …

 

 

 

 

 

Boast

The finest gadget …

 

 

 

 

 

 

Include testimonials/quotations –

As recommended by Harry Kane…

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Activity 2 – Tuesday 30th June 2020 

Skill: Write to persuade.

 

We will need to be really persuasive in our writing. Let’s warm up by creating some Crazy Persuasions. There are two activities below to help you practice the art of persuasion.

 

Activity 1:

Choose 4 of the scenarios below and write a short paragraph trying to persuade each to happen.

 

A cat to make friends with a dog

 A parent to let you stay out late

 A teacher to cancel all homework

 A prince/princess to marry you

The England manager to pick you for the team

A wicked witch to change her ways

 

 

Activity 2:

 

Estate Agent Role Play Take the role of an estate agent whose job it is to try and sell houses. You have a difficult challenge here to sell the run-down property in the picture. • Write your own persuasive paragraph • Use the writing frame and add in pushy, persuasive language • Design the poster that would be stuck in the estate agent’s window

Activity 1 Monday 29th June 2020

 Skill: Identify and use different vocabulary.

 

Here is a model persuasive text:

 

The Multi-Function Mobile Phone

 

 Are you a spy interested in the latest, state-of-the-art gadgets? If so, you will need the new Multi-Function Mobile Phone. Don’t be the only spy left stranded on your next mission unable to contact those back home. The Multi-Function Mobile Phone is the ideal phone for all spies as it boasts a host of amazing features. Firstly, it has worldwide access so that you can always be in contact with HQ. Additionally, it has a cloaking mode allowing you to make untraceable calls. This ideal mobile phone has the added bonus of a hidden tranquillizer dart that can be fired through the aerial. It is guaranteed to leave your enemies stunned (though with no serious after effects). A further feature is that the phone is made from titanium steel; it is unbreakable, working both underwater and in outer space! Perhaps the most essential reason for purchasing this ‘must-have’ phone is that it can only be used by the owner. Access to the phone is restricted using a Fingerprint Recognition Scanner (or F.R.S. for short). Your secret missions and evidence will be safe using this phone as it is simply impossible to hack into. Don’t just take our word for it! Listen to what James Bond – who is known by his code number 007 – has to say about this must-have phone: “I thought I had every gadget I required until Q invented the magnificent Multi-Function Mobile Phone. Now I wouldn’t possibly attempt a mission without it.” If that weren’t enough, the Multi-Function Mobile Phone comes complete with a wireless charger and free leather case. Make sure you don’t miss out: buy it today from any good spy shop!

Activity

The words below are from the model text. I want you to write down a definition and a synonym (a word that means the same or similar). If you are stuck, you could ask someone else in your home, use a dictionary or the internet.

Year 6 English WC: 22/02/2020       The City of Silence

This week we are going to continue with our poetry work, the work you did last week will help you this week.  

 

Friday 26th June 2020

Skill: Write a descriptive paragraph

 

Today  you are going to write a narrative or descriptive paragraph based around one of your favourite combinations. Try to describe the setting and how the character reacts to what they see. Remember to keep re-reading your writing to see if it works and if it needs a tweak here or there with the spelling or punctuation.

Here is an example describing The City Of Silence.

 

The City of Silence

 I took a trip to the city of silence where the streets were silent and no-one could utter a word. Cars passed by me without a sound and songless birds flew overhead. My feet didn’t even make a sound on the pavement when I walked: it sounded as if everything was made of cotton wool or had had the volume turned down to zero. I tried to talk to the people but I couldn’t even manage a squeak. An evil lord ruled over the city and had cast a spell on the people making it impossible for them to talk. Who could save them from this terrible fate? And who could save me?

 

Activity:

Now have a go at writing a descriptive paragraph about one of your combinations. If you are finding it a bit tricky you can ‘hug’ the description above to help you.

Activity 4 – Thursday  25th June 2020

Skill: Write a repeating poem.

 

Activity:

A poem with a repeating pattern For this poem, you will need a repeating phrase chosen from one of the ideas above. Here are some examples so you get the idea:

 I Got Lost I got lost in the castle of curses and never came out,

I got lost in the maze of confusion as….

I got lost in the land of dreams where….

 I got lost in the field of fear because….

 

In the Castle of Dreams

 In the castle of dreams there are….

In the castle of dreams you will….

In the castle of dreams no-one….

In the castle of dreams I…..

 

The Dungeon of Doom

The dungeon of doom is home to….

 The dungeon of doom wants you to…...

The dungeon of doom is a place where…..

The dungeon of doom can……

 

To extend this poem, each verse could be 4 lines on a different threatening setting.

 

E.g. Dungeon of doom followed by Cave of Death, Forest of Dread and Cavern of Fear.

 

Now have a go at a repetitive poem – continue on a separate page and add drawings if you want to.

Activity 3 – Wednesday 24th June 2020 – Skill: Ceate examples of Jauxtaposition.

 

Activity 1: Today you are going to have a go at creating examples of juxtaposition. You may not have heard of this before, don’t worry, it is quite simple and can be good fun.

 

 

If you haven’t heard of this term before, juxtaposition means having two opposite or contrasting ideas next to each other. This can surprise the reader as they might not be expecting it or have never heard it before.

 

The title of – The City of Silence – is actually an example of juxtaposition because a city is not normally silent but full of noise. Here are some other examples to help you think of your own.

The sun of darkness

The dungeon of love

 The black hole of light

The cave of dreams the waterfall of pain

 

Now have a go at coming up with five examples that use juxtaposition.

Activity 2 – Tuesday 23rd June 2020 

Skill: Extend my ideas.

 

Activity: Today you are going to use your combinations list you created last week and extend your ideas. Below are 3 different ways to extend your ideas, you are going to try each way.

 

Now let’s be a bit more adventurous! Go back to your list of combinations and I am going to show you 3 different ways of extending them: a.

 

  1. Adding in more detail

 

Here we want to describe more about either the place or the abstract noun and we will do this by adding in well-chosen adjectives.

 

 Example: The city of silence The city of silence … The forgotten city of silence

The city of silence … The city of frozen silence

 The city of silence … The forgotten city of frozen silence

 

Top Tip: sometimes using too many adjectives can cause your writing to be overwritten: The huge, gigantic, massive, ugly city of silence.

 

So, add some effective adjectives and make sure that the adjective you choose actually adds something to the writing. Pie tells us, “Every word should earn its place.”

 

Now try this method with three of your combinations.

 

b. Add in a character

This could be you or someone else and you’ll need a verb telling the reader what they are doing in your place. Example:

The river of lies

I swam in the river of lies and met a shoal of dishonest fish.

 

 The forest of nightmares

 • I got lost in the forest of nightmares.

• She went into in the forest of nightmares and never came back.

• Blake wandered into the forest of nightmares by mistake.

• Someone whispered in my ear stories about the forest of nightmares.

  Try adding a character into a new idea like the example here or add it into your favourite descriptive ideas from a) above.

 

Now try this method with three of your combinations.

 

C.  What it is like in your place

Here we are telling the reader what might be in your place, what could happen if you went there or how it got its name!

 Example: The castle of curses The castle of curses is home to all evil in the kingdom.

The castle of curses looms over the city forever watching.

Once you enter the castle of curses, you can never escape.

 

Now try adding all the ideas together and creating some powerful verses. Here’s one example – as you can see, I’ve been influenced by the lock down. I walked softly into the forgotten city of silence, staring at empty streets, abandoned shops and scary emptiness.

 

Top tip: Remember poems don’t have to rhyme – and they’re often more powerful if they don’t!

 

 

Now try this method with three of your combinations.

Activity 1 Monday 22nd June 2020 – Skill: Read And respond to a poem.

 

Activity: Today you are going to read the poem ‘The Cave of Curiosity’ and answer questions using the poem.

Below is the poem ‘The Cave of Curiosity’ it was written by Pie Corbett.

Start by reading the poem out loud a few times. You can also listen to a reading of the poem here: https://soundcloud.com/talkforwriting/city/ s-UmP7BEbB2cG

 

The Cave of Curiosity

 

 In the cave of curiosity, I created

an angry ant ambling along,

 a terrified tarantula tickling a tornado

 and a curious computer calling cautiously to the King.

 

 In the cave of curiosity, I created

the sound of silence closing its lips,

a hummingbird’s wings flickering,

as the sea silently scrapes the pebbles and ten tired lorries trundle by.

 

 In the cave of curiosity, I created

 the touch of smooth stones from the summer beach,

 the stickiness of honey on a fingertip

 and the heat from a teaspoon as it stirs my morning tea.

 

 In the cave of curiosity, I created

the coldness of frost as it freckles the windowpane,

the sharpness of a saw as it crunches through wood

and the sadness of a tear as it trickles down a cheek.

 

 In the cave of curiosity, I captured

 the moon’s cold gleam imprisoned in a box,

 the joy of a merry-go–round as it spins like a feral ferris wheel

and the force of a rainbow as it dazzles the sky with a smile that stuns.

 

Now answer the following questions:

  1. Which is your favourite word, line or verse? And why?

 2) Which line would you like to change? What would you change it to?

3) Which part of the poem did you find scariest, saddest or most unusual?

4) Find a part of the poem that uses alliteration really effectively.

 5) Write Pie a short piece of feedback about his poem. It could follow this structure:

1. Give some praise  2. Offer some advice  3. Ask a question

Year 6 English WC: 15/02/2020

 

The City of Silence

 

 

This week we are going to complete a number of activities that will help you to write a poem next week. We are going to think about lots of imaginary places.

 

Activity 5 – Friday 19th June 2020

Skill: Select my ideas and create a list poem.

 

Today we are going to use our ideas from all of this week’s lessons to create a list poem but first you need to select your best ideas.  We are going to complete 2 short activities then write a poem.

 

Activity 1:

Fancy being a teacher for a minute?

Have a go at judging some of these ideas. Number these combinations in order from ‘best’ to ‘worst’. Can you say why you have chosen the top one as your favourite? What is it about it that you like?

 

The city of kindness

The living room of boredom

The factory of creativity

 The farm of hunger

The forest of premonitions

 

Activity 2:

 

Now you have generated your list, you can start judging which ideas stand out. Reading your ideas out loud can help here to listen to the effect on the ear. Which ones might surprise your reader? Which ones have you never heard before? Which ones immediately conjure up an image in your mind’s eye? Look back at your ideas and create a list of your top ten combinations.

 

Let’s have a go at writing a simple poem now from your favourite 10 or so ideas. They could be around a theme (e.g. space, happiness, darkness) or just the combinations that really caught your eye. Have a look at the example below.

 

Space

 The planet of doom

The star of freedom

 The black hole of light

The moon of isolation

 The galaxy of hope

The universe of infinity

The sun of nightmares

 The solar system of confusion

 

Now have a go writing your own simple list poem

 

Activity 4 – Thursday  18th June 2020

Skill: Create sentences using alliteration.

 Let’s make some more combinations but this time try to make them alliterative: this means both your place and your abstract noun need to start with the same sound:

The cave of curiosity

 The temple of terror

The office of honesty

The motorway of mischief

 A star of sorrow

The fairground of fear

 

Activity:

Now have a go at your own alliterative combination – Aim for at least 15 combinations.

Activity 3 – Wednesday 17th June 2020 – Skill: Create  combination sentences.

 

Activity: Today we are going to use the tables you created on Monday and Tuesday to create combination sentences.

Choose one word from each list and put them together to make an interesting combination. Here’s how it works:

Each place can be paired up with any of the abstract nouns so the possibilities are endless! At this stage, try not to worry about whether they are ‘good’ or not just generate lots and lots of ideas so we have plenty to choose from later.

 

Now make as many combinations as you can! (At least 10)

Top Tip: You could choose ONE setting and then combine it with 5-10 abstract nouns and see which one surprises, entertains or interests you most.

 The school of doom

 The school of laughter

The school of determination

 The school of hope

The school of fun

The school of dreams

The school of pride

The school of friendship

The school of possibilities

 

Activity 2 – Tuesday 16th June 2020 

Skill: Make a list of abstract nouns.

 

Activity: Today you are going to make a list of abstract nouns so that you have a word banks when  you write your own poem.

 

Before we make our list, you might need to brush up on the four types of nouns:

 

  • Concrete nouns: the general names for people, places and things that you can see/touch/taste/smell etc. e.g. ball, table, grass, pony, child
  • Proper nouns: special names starting with capital letters e.g. Sarah, Dr Foster, Spain
  • Collective nouns: a word for a group of animals, people or things e.g. gang, swarm, crowd, pair
  • Abstract nouns: something that exists but you cannot see/touch e.g. love, dream, fear, hope

 

Question:  Is the word happy an abstract noun? 

Let’s try it out in a sentence: The man felt very happy as it was his birthday.

Here the word happy is describing the man. We call those words adjectives. We can change happy to an abstract noun by adding a suffix: happy – happiness.

The church filled with happiness on their wedding day.

• So the adjective sad becomes the abstract noun sadness

 • And the adjective lonely becomes the abstract noun loneliness

 

Activity:

Today we want lots and lots of abstract nouns.

Below I have started a table, I have selected a heading (Happy feelings, Sad feelings, Fantasy, Attitude words) and placed abstract nouns that belong with that heading underneath.

 

Continue the table, add some more abstract nouns to my headings then add another 3 headings of your own and a list of abstract nouns for each.

 

Happy feelings

Sad feelings

Fantasy

Attitude words

Hope

Regret

Curse

Determination

Love

Pain

Premonition

Ambition

Joy

Doom

Vision

Trepidation

 

 

Dream

Passion

 

 

 

 

 

Activity 1 Monday 15th June 2020 – Skill: Make a list of places.  

 

Here we want as many different type of places as possible – the more the better. For example: wood, city, shed, street, station, maze, cellar …

 

Top Tip: generic places are what we are looking for here, not the actual names of particular places: we want city not London, planet not Jupiter.

 

 One way to sort your places is to put them into categories. This often helps you to think of more ideas as one idea can lead to another and so on.

 

Activity: Look at the table below, you can continue the table and add more of your own ideas or create your own table.

Year 6 English Home learning WC: 08/06/2020

This week you are going to use your learning from last week to help you plan and write an alternative story ending.

We will be using the ending from The Tunnel.

‘The Tunnel’ – Ending

In the valley, below the village, ran the railway. Half an hour later, Henry walked along the tracks, his mind fixed on home. He could hear trains coming a long way off. The rails seemed to buzz a warning so that he could scramble up the bank and hide. The plan worked well enough until he came to Sapperton. Here, the train tracks disappeared into the dark mouth of the tunnel.

 

Henry stopped. To go back meant terrible trouble. School had ended a long time ago. Miss Hill would be fretting. At first, Henry didn’t feel too bad. Behind him, he had the light from the tunnel’s opening but, half way down, the tunnel curved: increasingly, the dark and cold closed round him like a poacher’s steel trap. He pulled his piece of sacking cloth to him, stood and listened: his breathing echoed, his heart thumped and, somewhere ahead, water dripped and something scuttled. Suddenly it hit him, and it all seemed too much: the bomber screaming overhead, the school shuddering as it scraped the bell tower, the tangled, smoking wreckage and the strangeness of trees and green fields. He sat down and waited, rocking as he cried.

 

Thomas Restall, a railway ganger, found the little boy, crouched in the darkness. Henry had tried to walk home but his shoes, resoled with an old tyre, had worn thin and, besides, the darkness had held him fast in its shadows.

 

Early in the evening dusk, as the stars started to freckle the sky, Thomas brought Henry back to Winsley Cottage. To his surprise, Miss Hill drew him close and whispered, “Oh Henry,” as she gently stroked his hair. Inside, the kitchen lamp glowed.

Thursday 11th and Friday 12th June 2020

Skill: To write an alternative story ending.

Activity 1:

Now that you have written your plan and toolkit, you are now ready to write your alternative ending. This shouldn’t be any longer than 3 paragraphs.

If you are finding it tricky you can ‘hug the text.’

To help you:

Remember to use:

  • The examples of different endings from last week.
  • The ending to the story ‘The Tunnel’ (Can be found below)
  • You timeline (You did this on Friday last week) 
  • Your plan (You did this on Tuesday)
  • Your toolkit (You did this on Wednesday)

Activity 2 – Edit and improve.

Just like at school, you are going to edit and improve your alternative story ending.

 

Step 1 – Read your ending and check your spelling and punctuation are correct.

Step 2 – Identify 4 words in your writing that you would like to improve – you can improve vocabulary using better words you already know or you can look new words up. Remember to think about the effectiveness of the vocabulary in your piece of writing, what effect will it have on the writer?

Step 3 – Improve at least 4 sentences in your writing, can you add extra information? Can you change the structure of your sentence so that it is more effective?

Step 4 – Use the checklist your toolkit and make sure all are included in your writing – tick the box when you have found evidence.

 

Activity 4: Wednesday 10th June 2020

Skill:  Create a toolkit and examples.

 

Activity: Look at the toolkit created below. Can you add some examples of each to use in your story ending and add them onto your table that you created yesterday.

 

Challenge: You may want to add more to the toolkit below.

If you are unsure what the toolkit is, I have put a definition and example in the toolkit column to help you.

Toolkit

 

Examples I will include in my ending.

Expanded noun phrase

 

2 adjectives are used to describe a noun.

 

 

Fronted adverbial

words or phrases placed at the beginning of a sentence which are used to describe the action that follows. Here are some examples: Before sunrise, Zack ate his breakfast. After the rain stopped, Sophie went outside to play.

 

 

Prepositional phrase

Tells us when or where

Examples:

In time…

Under the table…

Later that day…

 

Embedded clause

 

The tunnel, which was daunting, appeared to never end.

 

 

 

Verbs and adverbs

 

Verbs are doing/action words – walked, talked, ran.

Adverbs describve a verb – Shouted aggressively.

 

 

Activity 3: Tuesday 9th June 2020

Skill: Plan an alternative ending for the story ‘The Tunnel.’

Activity: Below I have created a table, in the first column I have used my timeline to jot down the key parts of the ending of ‘The Tunnel’ and in the second column I have started to note down the changes I will make. Today you are going to use this table o plan your own ending. You can use my table to help you get started or you can create your own (Remember to use your timeline to help you identify the key events.)

 

Challenge: Could you twist your story ending so that it ends on the point of view of another character? For example, you could end with Thomas Restell and how he feels at the end of the story.

Remember – this is a plan so it is just notes, you could use bullet points and words and phrases. You don’t need to write the whole ending now.  

Actual ending

My alternative ending

Henry left the village and walked along the tracks. He could hear trains approaching. The tracks buzzed in warning. Thomas knew he had time to scramble up the bank and hide.

Henry sprinted out of the village and headed to the train tracks. It was silent and there was no warning of approaching trains.

Henry arrived at Sepperton, the train tracks disappeared into a dark tunnel.

Henry stopped and thought about going back.

Suddenly the train track disappeared into a dark tunnel, Henry couldn’t hear or see anything apart from the sound of scurrying rats.

At first Henry felt ok but as he got deeper into the tunnel it grew darker and colder. His heart beat was fast, he could hear water dripping in the distance.

Henry felt nervous, a tear trickled down his face, he knew he had made a mistake but he couldn’t turn around now. Everyone would be so angry and he wanted to get home to see his Mum, he didn’t want to live with strangers any longer.

Thinking of the bomber and the wreckage of the school Henry felt overwhelmed, he sat down and sobbed.

 

Thomas Restell found Henry in the darkness and bring him back to Winsley cottage.

Henry was stuck in the tunnel, he lost count of the days.

To Henry’s surprised Miss Hill was pleased to see him and drew him close as she gently stroked his hair.

Approaching the cottage Miss hill stood on the doorstep, her face said it all…Henry was in trouble. His hands trambed and e dragged his feet trying to delay the moment he had to face her…

 

 

Activity 1: Monday 8th June 2020

Skill: Begin to plan and think about my ideas.

Activity: Read the ending of the story (above) Think about how the story ended, do you like this ending? What could be changed?

The timeline you created on Friday last week will help you with today’s lesson.

In your book create 3 mind maps, one for each of the type of story endings you looked at last week. On the mind map add ideas for ending the story ‘The Tunnel ‘in that way.

Create a mind map for:

  • A sad ending.
  • A cliff hanger
  • Explaining lessons that have been learned.

I have created an example for you below. You can use this to help you get started.

English wb 4.5.20 The Tunnel

This is an audio for the text we are looking at this week, just in case you might need some help with reading the text.

Year 6 English Home learning WC: 01/06/2020

Hi Year 6, thank you to those of you who sent me your letters for Audrey, there’s still time to email me your letter vicky.wells@portsdown.portsmouth.sch.uk before I ask Audrey your questions.

This week we are going to start thinking about ways to write an ending to a story, we are going to have a look at some examples, practise a short write and then next week you will have the opportunity to write a longer alternative ending for the story ‘The Tunnel’ we looked at a few weeks ago.

Friday 4th June 2020

Skill: Read and identify key parts of a story.

Today we are going to go back to the story ‘The Tunnel’. When writing an alternative ending it is really important that you have a good understanding of the whole story, so the work you are going to do today will really help you next week when writing your ending.

First re-read the story ‘The Tunnel’

Activity:

Today we are focusing on the ending of the story, just the section below. You need to understand this part of the story really well so today you are going to create a timeline just for this part of the story (NOT the whole story) Use the Little Red Riding Hood timeline as an example to help you (I have put it below for you.)

‘The Tunnel’ – Ending

In the valley, below the village, ran the railway. Half an hour later, Henry walked along the tracks, his mind fixed on home. He could hear trains coming a long way off. The rails seemed to buzz a warning so that he could scramble up the bank and hide. The plan worked well enough until he came to Sapperton. Here, the train tracks disappeared into the dark mouth of the tunnel.

 

Henry stopped. To go back meant terrible trouble. School had ended a long time ago. Miss Hill would be fretting. At first, Henry didn’t feel too bad. Behind him, he had the light from the tunnel’s opening but, half way down, the tunnel curved: increasingly, the dark and cold closed round him like a poacher’s steel trap. He pulled his piece of sacking cloth to him, stood and listened: his breathing echoed, his heart thumped and, somewhere ahead, water dripped and something scuttled. Suddenly it hit him, and it all seemed too much: the bomber screaming overhead, the school shuddering as it scraped the bell tower, the tangled, smoking wreckage and the strangeness of trees and green fields. He sat down and waited, rocking as he cried.

 

Thomas Restall, a railway ganger, found the little boy, crouched in the darkness. Henry had tried to walk home but his shoes, resoled with an old tyre, had worn thin and, besides, the darkness had held him fast in its shadows.

 

Early in the evening dusk, as the stars started to freckle the sky, Thomas brought Henry back to Winsley Cottage. To his surprise, Miss Hill drew him close and whispered, “Oh Henry,” as she gently stroked his hair. Inside, the kitchen lamp glowed.

 

Activity 4: Wednesday 3rd and Thursday 4th June 2020

Skill: Practise writing short alternative endings.

Activity: Look at the Little Red Riding Hood timeline below; write an example of each of the endings you looked at yesterday to go with Little Red Riding Hood. They don’t need to be long, a few sentences each will be effective as it is a short story.

Activity 3: Tuesday 2nd June 2020

Skill: Identify different types of story endings.

This week, we are going to focus on three different types of story endings.

We are going to think about:

  1. A cliff Hanger
  2. Explaining what has been learnt.
  3. Unhappy/sad ending.

 

Have a look the explanations in the table  below then have a read of the examples, using the definition you have been given to help you can you match them to the type of story ending from the list above?

In your book create a table like the one below and place each of the definitions and examples into the correct column.

Challenge: Once you have completed the table, think back to some stories you have read or have a look at some books you have at home. What kind of ending did the story have? Did it have one of the endings we have looked at today, if it does add the title of the story to the correct column in your table.

 

Cliff Hanger

Explaining what has been learnt.

Unhappy/sad ending

Explanation: When we have to wait until the final moment until we know, it leaves the reader in suspense. For example, the spy who manages to stop the bomb two seconds before it explodes.

 

Example 1:

 

Example 2:

 

 

Explanation: This is a reflective ending, reflecting on what one or more characters have learnt from their experiences throughout the story.

 

Example 1:

 

Example 2:

 

 

Explanation: tend to be more interesting than happy ones and full of emotive impact – so long as it is not overdone!

 

Example 1:

 

Example 2:

 

 

 

Examples: Copy these into the correct column in the table you have drawn into your book.

From the porch, she viewed the scene through the window. The kids were home again, a family, as if the last few days had never happened. Nora turned away before the lump in her throat could get any bigger. She shouldered her pack and started walking toward the road. It was time for her to go home, too. But where was her home, and was there a family waiting for her there?

 

As the trees rustled and the sunset set Hugo realised he was lost in the jungle, never to find his way out.

Harry was relieved that the week was finally over. At last he could go back home and lead a normal life. He had certainly learnt a lot over the past week. Most importantly, next time Craig suggested they go away on an adventure he would definitely say NO!

 

As the girl peered out across the town that was once her home, ash filled the sky and the last amber flames burned; a tear trickled from her eye and she fell to her knees. All had been lost.

The boys sat together thinking about the poor man. They were sorry that things had happened the way they had, and they still felt a little bit guilty. Jack sighed. He had learnt that it wasn’t always a good idea to go with the crowd.

 

We put the robot back in the garage, safely switched off. However, late at night, its evil red eyes flickered back on….

Activity 1: Monday 1st June  2020

Skill: Read possible story endings and think about how effective they are.

If you can access the internet, this video and activity will help you, complete this activity first.

https://www.bbc.co.uk/bitesize/topics/zpccwmn/articles/zwmt4qt

If you can’t access the internet don’t  worry you can still do the work just go straight to the activity below.

Activity.

Below are three different story endings, read each of the story endings very carefully, they are possible endings for a story called ‘The Heroes.’

Put the endings in order from best to worse then, for each ending write a short paragraph explaining why you think this, explain how the ending made you feel, did it leave you with any unanswered questions? What did you find out? Would you be happy or disappointed with the ending? Explain why.

 

Challenge:

Once you have completed the activity above, look at the ending you think is the worst. Can you re-write it so that it is more effective?

 

Sarah and Tom looked back at the smoke rising from the cave. It was over. They were safe; their families were safe; and so was their whole town. Never again would they be called cowards. The Snapper was dead and it was they who had killed him. Throbbing with pride the pair walked arm-in-arm down their street towards their homes where they would surely be greeted as heroes. Or would they?

 

Sarah and Tom looked back at the smoke rising from the cave. It was over. They were safe; their families were safe; and so was their whole town. The Snapper was dead at last. They turned away and walked proudly down their street. But they hadn’t gone more than ten metres before they were frozen in their tracks by an angry wailing roar. The Snapper was back! And this time he was ten times larger, and ten times fiercer.

 

Sarah and Tom looked back at the smoke rising from the cave. It was over. They were safe; their families were safe; and so was their whole town. Never again would they be called cowards. Throbbing with pride the pair walked arm-in-arm down their street towards their homes where everybody greeted them as heroes. John and Sam apologised to them for calling them cowards and never again were they made to feel miserable at school. In fact, they were very happy. Eventually they got married and had three children, and started their own dragon-taming business.

 

The Tunnel text

English Tasks 27.4.20

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